Cardiovascular Diagnostic Testing

Cardiovascular Testing/Procedures

Stress Testing

Cardiac Ultrasound

Vascular Ultrasound


Cardiovascular Testing/Procedures

Electrocardiogram EKG/ECG

What is the purpose of this test?

An electrocardiogram is a test that measures the electrical activity of your heart.

What can I expect during this test?

The technician will ask you to remove your clothing from the waist up and lie down on your back. Female patients will be given a gown to wear. Electrodes (small sticky patches ) with conductive gel are placed on each arm and leg and across your chest. After a few minutes of recording, the technician will remove the electrodes. The EKG/ECG may take a total of 10-15 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for this test?

No special preparations are necessary. Wear loose comfortable clothing that allows easy access to the chest. No pantyhose.

When will I get the results?

After a cardiologist reviews the EKG/ECG a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Event Recorder

What is the purpose of the test?

An Event Recorder is applied to record your electrical heart activity when you press the button. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate your electrical heart activity and correlate with your diary information when your cardiac symptoms are transient. This monitor may be worn for up to 30 days.

What can I expect during the test?

You will need to come to the hospital on two days. The first day a technician will place electrodes on your chest. The electrodes help transmit your heart beat information to the monitor when you press the button.. Wires will be attached to the small monitor (about the size of a pager) and you will need to wear the monitor for up to 30 days. The technician will provide you with a diary to record your symptoms and activities while wearing the monitor. It is important to record any symptoms and activities you experience while wearing the monitor. This will help diagnosis any abnormal heart rhythms or irregular heart beats. You will be instructed on the use of the monitor and how to transmit your recordings using the telephone. You will be given time to practice transmitting a recording prior to leaving the hospital. A cardiologist will evaluate your recorded tracings and give reccomendations with each transmission based on the information obtained. You will also be given extra supplies to change your electrodes when soiled, to bathe or shower. The first day the appointment takes approximately 30 minutes. The second day will only take a few minutes to return the monitor.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for this test. You may want to wear a loose fitting or button shirt for ease of application and your comfort. You may also wish to bring another person along if you need assistance with the instructions once you are home.

When will I get the results?

The results are interpreted by a cardiologist and are sent to your physician within two to three business days.

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Holter Monitor

What is the purpose of the test?

A Holter Monitor is applied to continually record your electrical heart activity for 24 or 48 hours. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate your electrical heart activity and correlate with any symptoms you might have when your physician suspects an abnormal heart rhythm or irregular heart beat.

What can I expect during the test?

You will need to come to the hospital on two days. The first day a technician will place electrodes on your chest. The electrodes help transmit your heart beat information to the monitor. Wires will be attached to the small monitor (about the size of a pager) and you will need to wear the monitor for 24 hours. The technician will provide you with a diary to record your symptoms and activities while wearing the monitor. The diary will note the time the monitor may be removed. It is important to record any symptoms and activities you experience while wearing the monitor. This will help diagnosis any abnormal heart rhythms or irregular heart beats. You will not be able to bathe or shower while wearing the monitor. The next day you will need to return the monitor and diary for evaluation. You may remove the monitor as instructed or wait to have a technician remove it for you when your arrive on the second day. The first day the appointment takes approximately 30 minutes. The second day will only take a few minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for this test. You may want to wear a loose fitting or button shirt for ease of application and your comfort. You may also wish to bring another person along, if you need assistance with the instructions once you are at home.

When will I get the results?

The results are interpreted by a cardiologist and are sent to your physician within two to three business days.

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Cardioversion

What is the purpose of this procedure?

A Cardioversion is a procedure where an electrical shock is delivered to the heart to convert an abnormal heart rhythm back to a normal rhythm. Most elective Cardioversions are performed to treat either atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. In atrial fibrillation, the heart rhythm is not a regular and organized rhythm, but rather chaotic electrical rhythm. This typically results in a fast and irregular heartbeat. While some patients have no symptoms, others may experience shortness of breath, lightheadedness and fatigue. Depending on your specific medical history and symptoms, your physician may recommend a Cardioversion to return your heart to a normal rhythm.

What can I expect during the procedure?

In the prep/recovery area, EKG leads will be applied and connected to a monitor/defibrillator that will monitor your heart rhythm and will eventually be used to convert that rhythm to a regular state. A blood pressure cuff and finger probe will be applied to monitor your blood pressure and oxygen saturation during the procedure. The nurse will give you moderate sedation in your IV for comfort. You will not be “put to sleep” as you would for surgery, but the medications ensure that the procedure is not painful, nor will you remember the event. After you have been sedated, the physician will apply two patches to your chest, and deliver an electrical current from the defibrillator to your heart. The current will “reset” the electrical conduction pattern from your baseline irregular rhythm to a normal/regular rhythm.

What can I expect after?

After your Cardioversion is performed, the patches will be removed from your chest, and you will be allowed to rest until your sedation has worn off. We will continue to monitor your heart rhythm until your discharge, which is normally one to two hours after completion of your procedure. You will be discharged home when you've completed your recovery. Specific discharge instructions will be given to you and your family concerning your level of activity and when you may return to your normal duties. A follow-up holter monitor test will be arranged for you prior to your discharge. This is typically scheduled two to three weeks after your Cardioversion.

Is there anything I need to prepare for the procedure?

  • Nothing to eat or drink after midnight.
  • If your doctor instructs you to take specific medications on the morning of your procedure, then you may take them with a sip of water.
  • If you were not given specific instructions regarding your medications, then bring them with you in their marked containers.
  • You must have someone to drive you home from the hospital and to stay with you for the next 24 hours.
  • You should not drive for 24 hours after your procedure.

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Stress Testing

Pharmacological Stress Test

What is the purpose of the test?

An Pharmacological Stress Test is performed to evaluate arterial blood flow to the heart muscle. This procedure is divided into three parts: Imaging at rest, pharmacological stress test, and imaging after exercise. The Adenosine Stress Test allows the physician to evaluate the arterial blood flow to the heart muscle at rest, the electrical activity of the heart during pharmacological stress, and the arterial blood flow to the heart muscle during stress to determine if there may be a relative decrease in blood flow to the heart muscle.

What can I expect during the test?

After registration, you will report to Cardiovascular Diagnostic Services. The nurse will ask you a few questions and start an IV (intravenous access). An isotope will be injected through the IV. You be given water to drink over the next 30 minutes to help with the images. You will then lie on a table while a camera takes pictures of your heart for 20 minutes. You will receive a light breakfast prior to the treadmill portion of the test. You will return to the Cardiovascular Diagnostic Services department approximately 30 minutes after your first set of pictures.

When you arrive for the stress test portion of the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up and put on a hospital gown. Electrodes will be placed onto your chest for ECG information. In order for the electrodes to stick, we may need to clip the hair where the electrodes will be placed. You may be asked to walk on the treadmill for a few minutes at a slow pace while the Adenosine is infusing in your IV over 4 minutes. Your ECG and blood pressure will be monitored during this portion of the test. You will be given another injection of the isotope 2 minutes prior to the end of the Adenosine infusion. After your walk on the treadmill, we will have you rest while we monitor your ECG and blood pressure until you return to resting rate.

The last portion of the test is the post exercise images. You will lie on a table while a large camera takes pictures of your heart for 20 minutes. Your IV will be removed prior to leaving the department. This test takes an average of 4 hours.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

It is important to wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes or sneakers (No high heels, dress, or constricting clothing). Do not have anything to eat or drink after midnight the day before the test. You may take your medications as directed by your physician with sips of water. DO NOT have any caffeinated or decaffeinated products, chocolate, tea, coffee or soda 24 hours prior to the test. DO NOT take any medications containing caffeine 24 hours prior to the test. Some medications that contain caffeine and should not be taken for 24 hours before the test are: Darvon, Fiorinal, Anacin, Excedrin and NoDoz. Some prescription medications for asthma and emphysema should not be taken at the time of the test include: Theophylline, Aminophylline, Theo-Dur. We will need a complete list of all prescribed and over the counter medications including the dose and frequency.

When will I get the results?

The results are interpreted by a cardiologist/radiologist and are sent to your physician within two to three business days.

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Nuclear Treadmill Stress Testing

What is the purpose of the test?

A Nuclear Treadmill Stress Test is performed to evaluate arterial blood flow to the heart muscle. This procedure is divided into three parts: Imaging at rest, treadmill stress test, and imaging after exercise. The Nuclear Treadmill Stress Test allows the physician to evaluate the arterial blood flow to the heart muscle at rest, the electrical activity of the heart during exercise, and the arterial blood flow to the heart muscle with exercise to determine if there may be a relative decrease in blood flow to the heart muscle from cholesterol blockages.

What can I expect during the test?

After registration, you will report to Cardiovascular Diagnostic Services. The nurse will ask you a few questions and start an IV (intravenous access). An isotope will be injected through the IV. You be given water to drink over the next 30 minutes to help with the images. You will then lie on a table while a camera takes pictures of your heart for 20 minutes. You will receive a light breakfast prior to the treadmill portion of the test. You will return to the Cardiovascular Diagnostic Services department approximately 30 minutes after your first set of pictures.

When you arrive for the treadmill portion of the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up and put on a hospital gown. Electrodes will be placed onto your chest for ECG information. In order for the electrodes to stick, we may need to clip the hair where the electrodes will be placed. You will be asked to walk on the treadmill for a few minutes. Your ECG and blood pressure will be monitored during this portion of the test. The goal is to reach at least 85% of your maximum target heart rate. You will be given another injection of the isotope 1 minute prior to the end of the treadmill test. After your walk on the treadmill, we will have you rest while we monitor your ECG and blood pressure until you return to base rate.

The last portion of the test is the post exercise images. You will lie on a table while a large camera takes pictures of your heart for 20 minutes. Your IV will be removed prior to leaving the department. This test takes an average of 4 hours.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

It is important to wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes or sneakers (No high heels, dress, or constricting clothing). Do not have anything to eat or drink after midnight the day before the test. You may take your medications as directed by your physician with sips of water. DO NOT have any caffeinated or decaffeinated products, chocolate, tea, coffee or soda 24 hours prior to the test. DO NOT take any medications containing caffeine 24 hours prior to the test. Some medications that contain caffeine and should not be taken for 24 hours before the test are: Darvon, Fiorinal, Anacin, Excedrin and NoDoz. We will need a complete list of all prescribed and over the counter medications including the dose and frequency.

When will I get the results?

The results are interpreted by a cardiologist/radiologist and are sent to your physician within two to three business days.

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Regular Treadmill Stress Testing

What is the purpose of the test?

A Regular Treadmill Stress Test is performed to evaluate arterial blood flow to the heart muscle during physical exercise. This noninvasive procedure allows the physician to evaluate the electrical activity of the heart during exercise and determine if there is a decrease in blood flow to the heart muscle because of cholesterol blockages.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up and put on a hospital gown. Electrodes will be placed onto your chest for ECG information. In order for the electrodes to stick, we may need to clip the hair where the electrodes will be placed. You will be asked to walk on the treadmill for a few minutes. Your ECG and blood pressure will be monitored during this portion of the test. The goal is to reach at least 85% of your estimated maximum heart rate. After your walk on the treadmill, we will have you rest while we monitor your ECG and blood pressure until it returns to your resting rate. This test takes an average of 60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

It is important to wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes or sneakers (No high heels, dress, or constricting clothing). Do not have anything to eat or drink for two hours before the test. You may take you medications as directed by your physician with sips of water. We will need a complete list of all prescribed and over the counter medications including the dose and frequency.

When will I get the results?

The results are interpreted by a cardiologist and are sent to your physician within two to three business days.

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Stress Echocardiogram

What is the purpose of the test?

A Stress Echocardiogram is performed using sound waves to evaluate images of the heart at rest and at the peak of exercise. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the blood flow to the heart muscle and to assess heart valve disease. Ischemia (reduced blood flow to the heart) is usually more apparent after some form of stress, such as exercise or medication. A Stress Echocardiogram can also be very useful in enhancing the interpretation of a routine exercise stress test. It can be utilized to exclude significant coronary artery disease in patients who are suspected of having a “false- positive” routine exercise stress testing. Here at the Heart and Vascular Institute we perform the stress portion of the procedure with exercise and without the use of a drug.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you will be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up and put on a hospital gown. Electrodes will be placed onto your chest for ECG information. The sonographer will place clear gel on your chest to transmit the sound waves from your heart to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your chest as the transducer is moved over your chest to obtain images of your heart while at rest. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. Once the pictures are acquired, you will walk on a treadmill for a few minutes. Your ECG and blood pressure will be monitored during this portion of the test. The goal is to at least reach 85% of your estimated target heart rate. Immediately after completing your walk on the treadmill, you will be asked to lie down on your side. The sonographer will acquire additional pictures of your heart using the transducer. The cardiologist will compare the images of your heart before and after the treadmill walk to see if there are any changes. The test takes an average of 60-90 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

It is important to wear comfortable clothing and walking shoes or sneakers (No high heels, dress, or constricting clothing). Do not have anything to eat or drink for two hours before the test. You may take you medications as directed by your physician with sips of water. We will need a complete list of all prescribed and over the counter medications including the dose and frequency.

When will I get the results?

The results are interpreted by a cardiologist and are sent to your physician within two to three business days.

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Cardiac Ultrasound

Echocardiogram

What is the purpose of the test?

An Echocardiogram is performed using sound waves to evaluate the valves and chambers of the heart. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate heart murmurs and other structures of the heart, check the pumping function of the heart and evaluate patients who have had heart attacks.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up and put on a hospital gown. Electrodes will be placed onto your chest for ECG information. The sonographer will place clear gel on your chest to transmit the sound waves from your heart to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your chest as the transducer is moved over your chest. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during the test. The test takes an average of 30-60 minutes. Please tell the sonographer if you are not able to lie still for the entire test so he/she may give you a break.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for this test.

When will I get the results?

The results are interpreted by a cardiologist and are sent to your physician within two to three business days.

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Vascular Ultrasound

Abdominal Duplex Scan

What is the purpose of this test?

An Abdominal Duplex Scan is an ultrasound procedure of the abdominal arterial vascular system. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the abdominal aorta to the iliac arteries. The sonographer is obtaining images to determine the size of the aorta, plaque formations and blood flow in the arterial vessels. The sonographer will also take measurements from the images to check for the presence or absence of an abdominal aneurysm.

What can I expect during this test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing and put on a hospital gown. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table with your abdomen exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your abdomen to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your abdomen as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. Images are recorded for the physician to review. This test is scheduled early on an empty stomach. The test will take an average of 60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

You may not have any thing to eat or drink after 10 p.m. the night before the test. DO NOT chew gum or smoke the day of the test. You may take your medications as directed by your physician with sips of water.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Ankle Brachial Index

What is the purpose of this test?

The Ankle Brachial Index is a procedure measuring the fall in blood pressure in the arteries supplying the legs. This noninvasive procedure allows the physician to detect peripheral vascular disease in the arterial vessels.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you will be asked to remove your clothing and put on a hospital gown. The sonographer will check your pulses and apply blood pressure cuffs to your arms, legs, and feet. The blood pressure cuffs will be inflated twice: once to obtain the pulse volume recordings and the second time for the segmental pressures (actual blood pressures) at each level of the cuffs. Your ankle-brachial index (ABI = the ratio between the brachial and the ankle pressure) will determine if walking on the treadmill is necessary. This test takes an average of 15 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation necessary.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Arterial Segmental Pressures

What is the purpose of this test?

This test is designed to determine if there are any blockages in the arteries supplying blood to the legs.

What can I expect during this test?

When you arrive for the test, you will be asked to remove your clothing and put on a hospital gown. The sonographer will check your pulses and apply blood pressure cuffs to your arms, legs, feet, and occasionally your toes. The blood pressure cuffs will be inflated twice: once to obtain the pulse volume recordings and the second time for the segmental pressures (actual blood pressures) at each level of the cuffs. Your ankle-brachial index (ABI = the ratio between the brachial and the ankle pressure) will determine if walking on the treadmill is necessary. This test takes an average of 60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for this test?

It does not require any special preparation.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Arterial Duplex Scan of Graft

What is the purpose of this test?

An Arterial Duplex Scan of a Graft is an ultrasound procedure of the arterial vascular system above and below a graft. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the arterial flow above, in and below the graft.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing and put on a hospital gown. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table with legs or arms exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your legs or arms to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your legs or arms as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. At times you will hear a “noise” which is the sound of blood flowing through your vessels. Images are recorded for the physician to review. The test will take an average of 45-60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation needed for the test.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Arterial Duplex Scan of the Lower Extremities

What is the purpose of this test?

An Arterial Duplex Scan of the Lower Extremities is an ultrasound procedure of the arterial vascular system in the lower legs. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the arterial vessels for size of the vessels and the presence of plaque.

What can I expect during the test?

You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table with legs exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your legs to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your legs as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. At times you will hear a “noise” which is the sound of blood flowing through your vessels. Images of the arteries are recorded for the physician to review. The test will take an average of 45-60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for the test. You should wear loose comfortable clothing.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Carotid Duplex Scan

What is the purpose of this test?

A Carotid Duplex Scan is an ultrasound procedure of the carotid arteries in the neck. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the arterial flow and plaque formation in the carotid arteries.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up and put on a hospital gown. The sonographer will place clear gel on your neck to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your neck as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. At times you will hear a “noise” which is the sound of blood flowing through your vessels. Images are recorded for the physician to review. The test will take an average of 45-60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for this study.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Renal Duplex Scan

What is the purpose of this test?

A Renal Duplex Scan is an ultrasound procedure of the kidneys and renal arterial vascular system. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the kidneys and renal arteries for plaque formation and blood flow.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing and put on a hospital gown. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table with your abdomen exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your abdomen to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your abdomen as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or may need to turn from side to side during this part of the test. Images are recorded for the physician to review. This test is scheduled early on an empty stomach. The test will take an average of 60-90 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

You may not have any thing to eat or drink after 10 p.m. the night before the test. DO NOT chew gum or smoke the day of the test. You may take your medications as directed by your physician with sips of water.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Venous Duplex Scan – Perforators

What is the purpose of this test?

A Venous Duplex with Perforators is an ultrasound procedure to evaluate the superficial and deep systems. This is noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the veins and the connections between the superficial and deep vein systems. Measurements are taken of the perforators and the blood flow between the two venous systems to evaluate leakage in the valves.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your pants, socks and shoes and put on a hospital gown. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table with your legs exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your legs to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your legs as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. At times you will hear a “noise” which is the sound of blood flowing through your vessels. Images are recorded for the physician to review. The test will take an average of 60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for this test.

When will I receive the results of the test?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Venous Duplex Scan- Reflux

What is the purpose of this test?

A Venous Duplex for Reflux is an ultrasound procedure to evaluate the blood flow through the valves in the veins. This is noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the valves in the veins. Leaking valves can cause the patient to have painful bulging veins on the surface of the legs and cause leg swelling.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your pants, socks and shoes and put on a hospital gown. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table with your legs exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your legs to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your legs as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. At times you will hear a “noise” which is the sound of blood flowing through your vessels. Images are recorded for the physician to review. The test will take an average of 60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for this test.

When will I get the results of the test?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Venous Mapping Lower Extremities

What is the purpose of this test?

A Venous Mapping for Lower Extremities is an ultrasound procedure of the greater saphenous vein. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the size and the depth of the greater saphenous vein for an arterial bypass.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your pants, socks and shoes and put on a hospital gown. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table with your legs exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your legs to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your legs as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. At times you will hear a “noise” which is the sound of blood flowing through your vessels. Images are recorded for the physician to review. The test will take an average of 45-60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for the test.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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Venous Mapping Upper Extremities

What is the purpose of this test?

A Venous Mapping for Upper Extremities is an ultrasound procedure of the basilic and cephalic veins in the arms. This noninvasive test allows the physician to evaluate the cephalic and basilic vein in preparation for a dialysis AV fistula.

What can I expect during the test?

When you arrive for the test, you may be asked to remove your clothing from the waist up and put on a hospital gown. You will be asked to lie on an ultrasound table you’re your arms exposed during the procedure. The sonographer will place clear gel on your arms to transmit the sound waves from your vessels to the machine using a transducer (a microphone looking device). You will feel a slight pressure on your arms as the transducer is moved over the area to obtain the images. You will be asked to lie still on your back or side during this part of the test. At times you will hear a “noise” which is the sound of blood flowing through your vessels. Images are recorded for the physician to review. The test will take an average of 45-60 minutes.

Do I need to do anything to prepare for the test?

There is no special preparation for the test.

When will I get the results?

After the physician reviews the test, a complete interpretation is sent to your doctor in 24-48 hours. Your doctor will discuss the results with you.

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