Medic Services

Medic 46

Since 1969, Hanover Hospital has provided pre-hospital care to the greater Hanover Area. Coronary 46, “the van”, was the first mobile coronary care unit in the state of Pennsylvania and 7th in the nation. This vehicle was in conjunction with Hanover Fire Department of Hanover Borough, Hanover General Hospital with Critical Care Registered Nurses and Dr. Bathon, Cardiologist with Hanover General Hospital.

Hanover Hospital has one of the few hospital-based non-transport, advanced life support units in the area—Medic 46. Following a 911 call, the unit brings medically trained personnel to the incident location. On-call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, this health professional team consists of Paramedics and Pre-hospital Registered Nurses. Today’s Medic 46 vehicles are extensively equipped with the same apparatus found in the hospital’s Emergency Department. Medic 46 responds to a variety of emergencies: chest pain, stroke, severe car accident injuries, drug overdoses, diabetes, asthma and other severe cases.

Dispatched by the local 911 communications center, Medic 46 covers 25 municipalities throughout the South Western quadrant of York County, the Eastern area of Adams County, plus mutual aid coverage to Gettysburg and western York County areas.

View the history of coronary care at Hanover Hospital, compiled in 2006 for Medic 46's 20th anniversary.


Emergency Medical Personnel

Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT)

An Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) is a trained professional who responds to emergency medical or traumatic situations. EMT’s provide a basic level of care.

Paramedics

A paramedic has completed the Emergency Medical Technician program. In addition to EMT Training, they have completed an accredited program requiring academic and clinical training. They are able to provide an advanced level of care including endotracheal intubation, inter-venous access, administer medications through various routes, and electrical therapy.

Pre-hospital Nurses (PHRN)

Pre-hospital nurses are Registered Nurses who have obtained additional training in the out of hospital setting. The Registered Nurse is trained how to do the skills of a Paramedic plus have an expanded scope of practice which enables them to administer a wider array of medications and blood products.

Pre-hospital Physician Extender (PHPE)

A PHPE may perform skills within a paramedic’s scope of practice and other skills a physician assistant is authorized to perform by the Medical Practice Act of 1985 or the Osteopathic Medical Practice Act (whichever applies to the physician assistant) when authorized by a medical command physician or an applicable Statewide or Department-approved EMS protocol.

Pre-hospital Physician (PHP) 

A PHP may perform skills within a paramedic’s scope of practice and other skills within the practice of medicine or osteopathic medicine.


Community Paramedicine Program

When a patient is discharged from the hospital, everything can seem like a blur. There are instructions for medications, diet, medical conditions and follow-up appointments. It can be hard to keep track of all the information. This confusion can lead to repeated emergency room visits or readmissions, especially for those with multiple chronic medical conditions.

The Community Paramedic Program is a free service designed to help our patients in this often difficult transition from hospital to home. Identified by the hospital care team – care managers, social workers, nurses or physicians – patients who agree to be part of this program receive follow-up visits at home from Hanover Hospital’s designated paramedic staff. These visits will occur usually within 24 to 48 hours of discharge and then regularly for up to four weeks, to help patients understand discharge instructions, answer any questions the patients may have, help the patient to adhere to treatment goals and reduce the risk of a readmission.

During the initial home visit, the paramedic will review discharge instructions, perform physical assessments and make sure prescriptions have been filled, medical equipment is functioning and doctor appointments are scheduled and can be kept. The paramedic may assess the environment for safety and make the patient and family aware of additional services in the community. In addition, the paramedic will relay any significant information or changes, as well as a visit summary, to the patient’s primary care provider. Patients do not need to be homebound to receive these services. In contrast to their more traditional role as emergency medicine providers, the paramedics will not provide treatments unless ordered by the patient’s physician.